Making Exercise Healthy Medicine


Bookspan Basics
Functional Fitness Training

Copyright © Jolie Bookspan. MEd, PhD, FAWM
Director  Neck and Back Pain Sports Medicine
Headmaster  Academy of Functional Exercise Medicine - the Fixa U (tm)


What does the word '"master" mean in the title Headmaster? Mastery over oneself. To be a skilled practitioner. To have qualified at a high rank. The best use of that term is to be those things, and actively work so that it does not mean to try to master others.

                  
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Hello, This is the fun page of Functional Fitness training. This is one topic on my large, no-ad web site, DrBookspan.com, for a healthy, mobile, pain-free, stronger, happy life. I worked years in experimental physiology, sports medicine, biomechanics, and related hard sciences to develop better techniques. I make my methods available for a better world.

There are hundreds of articles on my web site for you. Main navigation links are at the bottom of this (and every) page, along with Sharing Butttons.

On this page is a quick fun program I developed to make healthy movement into a powerful sports and life enhancer. The methods are evidence-based, primary-source sports medicine. You can learn them for yourself, and also lead your groups. These are summaries, with a wealth of knowledge still to give in my appointments and classes and books.

This page also tells how you can send me your photos and videos using these Bookspan Basics so you can be on this page as role model.

 


 

What Are Bookspan Basics
Functional Retraining Drills?

 

I didn't want a disease named for me, but a cure

Teachers, coaches, parents, babysitters, trainers, physicians, and others asked me for specific things they could use to teach baseline healthful movement skills to their sports teams, exercisers, clients, patients, schools, classes, and for themselves:

 

Be A Role Model and Get Valuable and Free Feedback

1. Send me your short videos (30 seconds or so) of trying or teaching each. I will send you valuable feedback on them and help you develop them. I will add the best ones here on this page to benefit all with credit to YOU. Nothing goes on YouTube. Don't post anything publicly without first checking with me - Instructions on the Projects Page - Project 9

2. Send your success photos and stories of how you use these great training drills (intelligently) in your program for the Success page. Or send photos of you or your students doing each skill - one photo showing wrong movement and one showing change to healthy. Don't post anything publicly without first checking with me - Instructions on the Projects Page - Project 7.

3. I am looking for a Director of Youth Programs to take these functional Basics to schools and youth centers everywhere, and a Director of Healthy Aging to take these same skills to elder centers, residents and staff of convalescent and retirement homes, and individuals. I am developing a traveling health show teaching these (properly - see me first - in classes and private appointments). See the Academy page for what we do and Academy Students to see programs we have made, to give you ideas for more.

 

1.

First Group Functional Training Exercise:
Fixing Swayback to Healthy Neutral Spine

 

Here is the first of the series of Bookspan Basics Functional Fitness Training that you can teach your teams, squads, classes, students, kids, groups, battalions, etc. It teaches a healthy spine position habit needed for most of all else that you do in daily life and in sports. In this Basic you change a bad spine position to a healthy position.

Left - Bad positioning habit of allowing swayback (hyperlordosis) and position of hands at top and bottom of front abdominal muscles
Right - Practicing how to use hands to understanding reducing abdominal muscle length to move spine from hyperlordosis to neutral

 

PREP:

Assemble your group in neat rows so you can see each participant, and they feel the self-control of the neat rows. Stand in front facing sideways so everyone can see you in profile view.

Tell them that the first Functional Fitness Training is a basic move that is needed to fix a bad posture habit that is one major cause of lower back pain - Fixing Hyperlordosis also called Swayback. There are several ways to learn how to use the healthier spine position of neutral spine. This one is chosen for Books[an's Basics because it does not need a wall, and can be done standing:

HOW TO DO IT:

  1. Tell everyone to stand and notice how much inward curve they are using in their lower back. Tell everyone to notice if their pelvis is tilting forward and if they are leaning their upper body backward.  Also helpful to observe others (respectfully and for educational purposes where applicable).

  2. Tell everyone to put one hand at the top of their front abdominal muscles where they attach to the bottom of the ribs in the middle, and the other hand at the bottom of their abdominal muscles,  where they attach to the front center of their pelvic bones Left-hand photograph above shows approximate attachment points of abdominal muscles and hands

  3. Have everyone move their torso so that both hands pull closer to each other. The body remains upright, not curling forward. Tell everyone to feel the movement they just produced in their spine, as if they had done a small crunch pull from both top and bottom of abdominal muscles to move both the ribs downward, and the pelvis from tilted to vertical.
 
TEACHING POINTS:

The movement to is reduce hyperlordosis, also called swayback to neutral spine. It is not to curl forward or make posture unnatural.

Done properly, participants will feel abdominal muscles in use, but not tightening in any way.

There is no tightening of gluteal or any other muscles. It is common to co-contract other muscles, but they are not how you move your spine from swayback to neutral.

To become proficient in understanding this to better teach it, see the article summarizing Fixing Swayback Pain on this web site.

This is the First Functional Training exercise. After learning this basic, learn and use the others below to teach your groups (or self) how to prevent common muscles issues that arise during the team season or operational theater.

 

Good body mechanics are a powerful performance enhancing aid.

 

 

SEND IT IN:
Send in your photos or videos of teaching or trying these and I will add the best here to benefit all. Trainers, send in your stories of how you use them in your program. Instructions on the Projects page.

 

RELATED READINGS from DR. BOOKSPAN's Fitness Fixer Column:

 

Book Explaining All of Fixing Swayback and Getting Healthier Stronger Abdominal Exercise:

 

 

Photo of my student Cynthia demonstrating the "hands on Abs method" copyright Dr. Bookspan

 


2.

Second Group Functional Training Exercise:
Good Bending for Back and Knees

 

Here is the second of the series of Bookspan Basics Functional Fitness Training that you can teach your teams, squads, classes, students, kids, groups, battalions, etc.

PREP:

Assemble your group in neat rows so you can see each participant, and they feel the self-control of the neat rows. Stand in front facing sideways so everyone can see you in profile view.

Tell them that the first Functional Fitness Training is a basic move that is needed many dozens of times every day, for their special sport or activity and for daily life - good bending:


HOW TO DO IT:

  1. Tell everyone to keep both heels down on the ground (right drawing) while they bend their knees and crouch about halfway down.

  2. Tell everyone to look down at their own feet and pull their (bent) knees back until they can see their toes (right drawing). Tell them if they cannot see their toes because their knees cover their toes, their knees are too far forward (left).

  3. Have everyone notice their NECK. Healthy neutral neck position is a big part of healthy bending. Have them learn to notice and correct a lifted chin and tilted back neck. Straighten neck gently in relaxed manner. Learn to recognize that most of the motion comes from straightening the UPPER body.

  4. Have everyone stand upright, legs straight, then bend again. Adjust knee placement, lower back angle, and neck angle, if needed. Rise and bend again. The goal is to be able to bend each time with knees aligned over feet, neutral lower spine and neck (right). They should feel the difference - using thigh and hip muscles, instead of sliding weight forward onto the knees, and no more strained angled neck.
 
TEACHING POINTS:

Repeat good bending 10 times or any number that suits your group's need - more for groups needing higher training (or groups with poorer memory), faster for teams requiring this skill done quickly in actual use, and so on.

Put items on the ground they use for their sport or work and use the new good bending to pick up the items. Then replace the items on the ground with good bending, and retrieve with good bending. Repeat for the number suited for your needs.

Tell everyone that this is how they bend for picking up all their gear (except medical or tactical reason not to).

Watch them for good bending practices throughout the team season.

Reduce back injury from bad bending, get leg exercise, burn calories, and build strong bones from the many free built-in squats daily.

This is the Second Functional Training exercise. After learning this basic, learn and use the others below to teach your groups (or self) how to prevent common musculo-skeletal issues that arise during the team season or operational theater.

 

Good body mechanics are a powerful performance enhancing aid.

 

 

SEND IT IN:
Send in your photos or videos of teaching or trying these and I will add the best here to benefit all. Trainers, send in your stories of how you use them in your program. Instructions on the Projects page.

 

RELATED READINGS On This Web Site:

 

 

RELATED READINGS From My Former Column, The Fitness Fixer:

 

Drawing of Backman(tm) copyright Dr. Bookspan

 


3.

Third Group Functional Training Exercise:

Ankle Stability and Ability
PLUS Healthy Neutral Spine When Raising Heels To Stand On "Tip-Toe" / Ball Of The Foot
(and wearing heeled shoes)

 

This is the third of the series of Bookspan Basics that you can teach your teams, squads, classes, students, kids, groups, battalions, etc. This drill teaches both ankle stability AND how to stand on the ball of the foot in healthy neutral spine. Rising to "half-toe" to "stand on tip-toes" or to wear high heels does not MAKE YOU stand in bad posture. You control your spine and legs the same as during any other movement.


Left - bad positioning habit allowing ankle sprains. Right - Practicing how to prevent ankle sprain through specific proprioception

 

PREP:

Assemble your group in neat rows. Stand in front facing forward. Everyone sees your feet and you see each participant's feet. Footwear is whatever used for their sport or activity. Also try to practice barefoot and in different shoes so that you do not get your balance only from your shoes. You need to learn that support comes from you muscles and your own proprioception. Use or lose.

Tell them this Functional Fitness Training drill is a basic, needed many dozens of times every day, for their sport or activity, and for daily life - ankle stability when rising to the ball of the foot (sometimes called standing on toes or half-toe), stepping down, landing from jumps, running, turning skills, and other motions requiring ankle stability. This skill teaches you how to prevent ankle sprains, when used properly. Your own proprioception, which is your body knowing what position it is in, is more helpful to preventing and rehabilitating sprains than the standard "stretch and strengthen" rehab, or wearing braces or high top shoes, which reduce your own proprioception.

 
A video should appear above of this Bookspan Basic Ankle Drill - Ankle Stabilization. The video has no sound (and neither should your ankle)

If the video doesn't show on your browser, click directly from my Flickr.com collection, TheFitnessFixer: https://www.flickr.com/photos/thefitnessfixer/16759547880/

 

This skill is also easy practice and understanding that standing on the ball of the foot, as when wearing high-heels, does not "make" you stand badly or "arch your back" (stand in swayback or hyperlordosis). You control your spine and can hold neutral spine the same as during all other standing, walking, and activity. People may lean backward and/or increase lumbar arch when they haven't trained balance and neutral spine. It does not take much training, just knowledge and doing it.

In the two photos below, my student Leslie demonstrates standing "tip-toe" (raised heels). In the first photo, Leslie stands swayback (yellow arrow points to area of increased lumbar compression. Red line shows tilted pelvis). The second photo shows standing with raised heels in neutral spine. Green line shows vertical pelvis. One foot is more forward for two reasons - first so you can see both feet and also that is part of how you walk, while wearing heels or not. (Note, in the second, corrected photo, Leslie is still leaning the upper body back very slightly. WHen you do this, keep upper body vertical for standing)

    
All movement to change swayback to neutral comes from the spine. There is no tightening of abs, there is no "sucking in," and no "navel to spine." That is not how you move. The belly looks slimmer and more athletic because the pelvis is no longer tipped into swayback, so the abdomen is not curved outward. Leslie is 75 years old in this photo. See her video of doing 30 neutral spine pushups on the Fitness as a LIfestyle page.

 

Next my student Paula:

       
In the above two photos, my student Paula shows standing in raised heel position, first with swayback (first photo, with red X indicating wrong), then correcting spine to neutral (second photo with green check mark). Note that no knee bending is needed. I asked her to do this for photos in the middle of an exercise class. She had no warning or prep time. A great student.

 

HOW TO DO IT:

  1. Tell everyone to stand with both feet acing straight forward and to lift heels to stand on the ball of the feet

  2. Tell everyone to look down at their own feet. Feet and ankles should be held vertically (right photos) not allowed to tilt outward/sideways toward the small toes (left photo). While everyone holds tip-toe, make sure each participant straightens ankles, shifting weight back toward the big and second toe.  Have them reduce any swayback to neutral spine.

  3. Have everyone stand flat on full foot again, then rise to half-toes again (up on the ball of the bottom of the foot). Adjust if needed. Repeat good heel-rising 10 times or any number that suits your group's need - more for groups needing higher training (or groups with poorer memory), faster for teams requiring this skill done quickly in actual use, and so on. The goal is to be able to rise each time with healthy ankle and healthy lumbar spine.
.

 

TEACHING POINTS:

Tell everyone that this is how they rise to tip-toe - onto the ball of the foot - for all needs, not just as an exercise (except medical or tactical reason not to).

All participants should feel the difference - using leg and ankle muscles instead of letting body weight slide sideways, which bends ankles into classic sprain position - turned at the outside (inversion).

Tell everyone they will need this for the next skill - for stepping down and landing from jumps.

Watch them for good ankle stability practices throughout the team season. Reduce ankle injury from letting the ankle invert (turn sideways to a position likely to sprain). Instead use muscles and conscious control to prevent inversion sprains and turns, and get leg, foot, and ankle exercise, from the many needed neutral-ankle stability needed for varies movements daily.

 

Good body mechanics are a powerful performance enhancing aid.

 

SEND IT IN:

Send in your photos or videos of teaching or trying these and I will add the best here to benefit all. Trainers, send in your stories of how you use them in your program. Instructions on the Projects page.

 

RELATED READINGS On This Web Site:

 

 

RELATED READINGS from My Former Column, The Fitness Fixer :

 

 

Photo of ankles © copyright Dr. Bookspan from the book Healthy Martial Arts

 


4.

Fourth Group Functional Training Exercise:
Ankle and Knee Stability in Jumps and Landings

 

Here is fourth in the series of Bookspan Basics Functional Fitness Training.

 

PREP:

Assemble your group in neat rows. Make sure all can see you and you can see them.

Tell them this is a basic, functional physical skill to reduce musculo-skeletal injuries, that puts together the first and second skills, previously learned.

 

HOW TO DO IT:

  1. Tell everyone to crouch using good bending (knees do not sway inward or slide forward toward the toes (taught in the first Bookspan Basic above), then rise to ball of the foot with stable neutral ankle (not tilting outward to the side toes, taught in the second Bookspan Basic above).

  2. Next, have everyone bend and rise increasingly rapidly and smoothly, in a jumping motion, first without rising from the ground, then barely jumping. With each bend and rise, they maintain good knee bending and neutral ankle. Repeat 10-100 times, depending on time and needs.

  3. Next, tell everyone to jump, landing softly (rolling down from ball of the foot to full foot) using thigh and hip muscles for shock absorption, and good knee bending and neutral ankle. Start jumping moderately, then work for increasing height with each repetition. Repeat 10-100 times, depending on time and needs.

 

 

TEACHING POINTS:

Teach everyone that this is how to land from stepping, jumping, and descending terrain and stairs for all needs, not just as an exercise (except medical or tactical reason not to).

Use conscious control to prevent inversion ankle sprains and turns by not allowing the ankle to invert (turn sideways) when rising to ball of the foot during push-off in running and jumping, and coming down during landings.

Watch for healthy ankle and knee stability and placement throughout the team season.

Each Bookspan Basic Functional Training exercise shows how to teach your groups (or self) how to prevent common musculo-skeletal problems during the team season or operational theater. Learn this one to be ready for an upcoming Basic Skill, needed for cutting, changing direction, lateral movement, more.

 

Good body mechanics are a powerful performance enhancing aid.

 

SEND IT IN:

Send in your photos or videos of teaching or trying these and I will add the best here to benefit all. Trainers, send in your stories of how you use them in your program. Instructions on the Projects page.

 

RELATED READINGS On This Web Site:

 

 

RELATED READINGS from My Former Column, The Fitness Fixer:

 

Photo by Éole via Flickr

 


 

5.

Fifth Group Functional Training Exercise:
Functional Upper Back Stretch

 

This Bookspan Basics Functional Fitness Training retrains how you look upward and reach upward, to reduce neck and shoulder compression and give a built-in extension stretch for the upper back:

Photo (left) Folding back at the neck and jutting the chin forward makes unhealthful neck compression.
(postural spondylolisthesis). Drawing (right) shows extending more from upper spine, keeping more neutral neck.

 

PREP:  

Assemble your group in neat rows. Make sure all can see you and you can see them.

Explain that whenever you look upward, to get more range of motion from the upper back, not the neck alone. Have them feel, notice, and visualize where is their upper back. One way to do this is to tell them to watch a person in line ahead of them.

 

HOW TO DO IT:
  1. Remind the group that the concept is not to pinch the neck back (photo above of drinking) but to "unround" and lift upward more from the upper body.

  2. Have everyone turn their head to gaze upwards upward by straightening the upper back and by lifting more in the chest (drawing on the water bottle pictured below, upper bike rider).

  3. Repeat while reaching upward with both hands. Make sure not to return to pinching backward at the neck, jutting the chin forward (photo above), or leaning the upper body backward. Get the reach from the shoulders. Send your photos and videos so I have a healthful example to post here.

 

TEACHING POINTS:

The upper back is often maintained rounded forward (too much kyphosis) resulting in eventual deformity, stiffness, and chromic upper back pain. The neck is often misused resulting in chronic impingement and wear.

The upper back can be stretched by getting range of motion for daily life which also reduces compressive pinching of the neck from mistakenly concentrating motion at one vertebral segment of the neck.

Extend the upper spine instead of craning the neck.

Tell everyone that this is how to gaze upward for all needs, not just as an exercise (except medical or tactical reason not to). Use conscious control to prevent pinching your neck back every time you look and reach upward.

Watch them for good upward gazing and practices throughout their exercise and daily use.

The water bottle (pictured) and other fun teaching tools are available at Bookspan BackSavers through Cafe Press.

 

Good body mechanics are a powerful performance enhancing aid.

 

 

SEND IT IN:
Send in your photos or videos of teaching or trying these and I will add the best here to benefit all. Trainers, send in your stories of how you use them in your program. Instructions on the Projects page.

 

 

RELATED READINGS On This Web Site:

Book to Learn Functional Stretching:

 

RELATED READINGS From My Former Column, The Fitness Fixer:

 

 


6.

Sixth Group Functional Training:
Ankle and Knee Stability & Safety With Lateral Movement

 

Here is the sixth in the series of Bookspan Basics Functional Fitness Training (FFT) to teach your group, teams, classes, students, kids, battalions…

In this Bookspan Basic, learn to be ready for changing direction, cutting, lateral movement, landing to the side from jumps, slips and missteps, and more. It builds on a previous Functional Training exercise where you learned to jump with good lower body mechanics.

 

PREP:  

Assemble your group in neat rows. Make sure all can see you and you can see them.

Tell them this is a basic, functional physical skill to learn how to reduce lower body injuries during sideways jumps.

Remind them they use the previously learned principles from the training of vertical jumps.

 

HOW TO DO IT:

  1. Have everyone crouch using good bending (knees do not sway inward or slide forward, taught in the first Bookspan Basic above (FFT), then rise to the ball of the foot with stable neutral ankle, not tilting or swaying toward the small toes, as taught in the second Bookspan Basic above). Remind them that when they land from a jump they use the same neutral ankle.

  2. Next, have everyone to leap sideways at once, off one leg onto the other foot, landing softly with good knee bending and neutral ankle. On landing, the knee is already above the foot, not bent inward. Foot is neutral, not flattened inward (pronated) or turning outward like a sprain (inversion and supination).

  3. Leap back to starting place onto the other foot. On landing, the knee is already above the foot. Repeat leaping sideways from foot to foot. With each landing, watch the knee of the landing leg. Make sure the knee doesn't sway inward of foot.

 

TEACHING POINTS:

Improve by jumping increasingly fast, and far, for longer periods of time.

Tell everyone that this is how they land for all needs, not just as an exercise (except medical or tactical reason not to).

Learn this to be ready for the sixth one coming next, needed for cutting, changing direction, lateral one legged movement, more.

 

Good body mechanics are a powerful performance enhancing aid.

 

SEND IT IN:

Send in your photos or videos of teaching or trying these and I will add the best here to benefit all. Trainers, send in your stories of how you use them in your program. Instructions on the Projects page.

 

RELATED READINGS On This Web Site:

 

Photo by Wouter Verhelst

 


 

7.

Seventh Group Functional Training:
Advancing Ankle and Knee Safety With Single Leg Movement

 

Here is the seventh in the series of Bookspan Basics Functional Fitness Training to teach your group, teams, classes, students, kids, battalions, or self. In this Bookspan Basic Training, advance your lower leg stability with single leg use, to be ready for landing from jumps, slips and missteps, and more.

This skill builds on earlier Functional Training exercises, where you learned to jump vertically (up and down) and leap laterally to one foot (side to side) with good lower body mechanics. Make sure to know them first.

 

PREP:  

Assemble your group in neat rows. Make sure all can see you and you can see them.

Tell them this is a basic, functional physical skill to learn how to reduce knee and ankle injuries during sideways jumps. Remind them they need to use the same principles from a previous Basic Training of vertical jumps.

 

HOW TO DO IT:

  1. Have everyone bend both knees to crouch using good bending (knees do not sway inward or slide forward, taught in the first Bookspan Basic above), Then rise to the ball of the foot with stable neutral ankle (not tilting or swaying outward to the side toes, taught in the second Bookspan Basic above).

  2. Have them stand on one leg only. Repeat crouching then rising to the ball of that foot (half-toe) on that one leg. Rise and lower on one leg. Don't let body weight sway outward to the small toes, turning the ankle.

  3. Keep strong neutral stance. Repeat 10-100 times, depending on time and need.

  4. Then use all good mechanics to hop - jump and land on that one leg. Hop 10-100 times, depending on time and need. Change legs and repeat.

 

TEACHING POINTS:

Lower limb stability and placement during landings of all kinds prevents injuries. Practice so you don't turn your ankle or knee.

Remind students and self that when landing from a jump, use the same good bending and neutral ankle, all the time, not just as an exercise (except medical or tactical reason not to). .

Each new Functional Training exercise shows how to teach your groups (or self) how to prevent common musculo-skeletal problems during the team season or operational theater.

Good body mechanics are a powerful performance enhancing aid.

 

SEND IT IN:

Send in your photos or videos of teaching or trying these and I will add the best here to benefit all. Trainers, send in your stories of how you use them in your program. Instructions on the Projects page.

 

 

RELATED READINGS from DR. BOOKSPAN:

 


 

8.

More to Come, Check Back. Thanks.

 

 


 

Fun Things To Try Next

Get personal written answers to your well thought-out questions - Individual Care.

Learn In Person. Learn top training techniques. Fix your pain. Group CLASSES and Private Appointments for yourself or your private groups.

Patient Success Stories. Read how others fixed their own pain and see how to send yours. Not mere testimonials, but tutorials so you can do it too.

Adventure Medicine  - Higher, faster, stronger, smarter, funnier.

Fix Your Pain With Fitness as a Lifestyle (Functional Fitness). Not reps of exercises or purchasing training "plans" and devices, but how you move all day, making your daily real life into your own mental, emotional and physical playground of strength mobility and health for knees and the rest of you.

More Free Fix Pain Articles on This Web Site. Fix Back Pain, Knee Pain, Leg, Foot, Hamstrings, more. Click the Clinical Page and scroll down to "Start Right Now."

The Academy of Functional Exercise Medicine - Fellow Advancement, Awards, Better Earth through Dr. Bookspan's Academy.

Send Your Success Stories and Photos to me on TWITTER! Prizes for the best ones. Tweet nice notes and success stories how you are better, which is my big reward. Follow me on Twitter @TheFitnessFixer for health updates, quick & short. Sharing buttons at the bottom of this page.

TYPOS - Are You A Helpful Reader?  - If you found typos, broken links, or things needing correction on my site, tell me so I can fix them to help everyone, with my thanks: typos@DrBookspan.com.

Mailing list. I don't send out any mails or keep any lists. For updates, info, articles, fun helpful stuff whenever you want, look at my TWITTER page. No sign-up or log-in needed. If you join ("follow") then you can ask questions too: www.Twitter.com/TheFitnessFixer.

Mental & Emotional Training - a page of Dr. Bookspan's short articles for stronger emotional health.

The Fitness Fixer - Dr. Bookspan IS The Fitness Fixer. My column ran on Healthline from 2006 to 2010. After that, they took them all away in favor of their own articles that sell medicines and treatments, The BlogSpot archives still have some of them. Check for articles on Achilles pain, foot, shoes, orthotics, knees, back, nutrition, and more by alphabetical listing. Click here for fun Index. Updates through Twitter, above.

Open our RESORT for healthy life training - maybe at your campus, studio or cruise ship? Also join fun and instructive Dr. Bookspan projects - design our Academy logo, be in my next book, write rap and songs about back pain fixes. Click Projects.

T-shirts and Mugs. Learn and promote functional health with UNcommon sense gifts from the Academy.

 

Books

How to fix your pain and get healthier. All the books together cost less than your prescription pain killers, and show you how to never need them again. More info about each and more book on my BOOKS page.

             

Health & Fitness" THIRD edition - step by step instructions to fix neck pain, back pain, and living a healthy, fun, pain free life. Includes exercise in and out of a gym, health for body and brain, nutrition, drugs, body fat tests, and having fun throughout your life.

Fix Your Own Pain" of all kinds - neck pain, back pain, shoulder and hip pain, knee pain, ankle and foot injuries, wrist pain, and everything else,featuring actual patient stories in every chapter.  The top of the line book - Healthy Martial Arts - for athletes of any sport. A treasure of training for strength of thinking, spirit, body, and life.

Stretching Smarter Stretching Healthier - Fun, innovative, immediately useful.

The Ab Revolution Fourth Edition - No More Crunches No More Back Pain  Print 4th Edition 
Also available in Kindle and Nook. Click here for The Ab Revolution Fourth Edition in Kindle.
The Ab Revolution is core training the way your body actually needs. Two parts: Part 1- Learn neutral spine to stop a major form of lower back pain. Part 2- Functional strengthening from simple moves to the toughest you can get.

Diving Physiology in Plain English - Hard to find classic for divers, written by Dr. Jolie Bookspan, the Navy researcher who did the work in the field. BLUE cover is the latest edition. (Green was old)  Get the new BLUE.

 


 

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